University of Hawaii

Department of Electrical Engineering

The Promise of Smart Grid: Reliability and Efficiency

Date: 2011-02-24
Time: 4:30 – 5:30 pm
Location: Hawaii Institute of Geophysics (HIG 110) 2525 Correa Road Honolulu, HI 96822
Speaker: Anjan Bose Regents Professor, School of EECS Washington State University Pullman, Washington

About the speakerAnjan Bose is a Regents Professor and the Distinguished Professor of Electric Power Engineering at Washington State University in Pullman, Washington, where he also served as the Dean of the College of Engineering & Architecture from 1998 to 2005. He is a leading researcher on the operation and control of the electric power grid. He has worked in the electric power industry as well as academe for over 35 years. Dr. Bose is a Member of the US National Academy of Engineering, a Foreign Fellow of the Indian National Academy of Engineering, a founding Board Member of the Washington State Academy of Science, and a Fellow of the Institute of Electrical & Electronics Engineers (IEEE). He was the recipient of the Outstanding Power Engineering Educator Award, the Third Millenium Medal, and the Herman Halperin Electric Transmission & Distribution Award from the IEEE. He has been recognized by both Iowa State University and the Indian Institute of Technology with their distinguished alumnus awards. He has served on several editorial boards and on many technical committees and conference organizations. He was appointed by the governor to the board of directors of the Washington Technology Center, and by the US Secretary of Energy on the committee to study the 1999 and 2003 power blackouts. He has served on several committees of the US National Academies including those for Engineering Education, Cybersecurity Research, Power Grid Security, and America’s Energy Future. He has consulted for many electric power companies and related government agencies throughout the world.

 

Abstract:  Smart Grid has become a catch-all phrase to encompass all new technologies for the generation, transmission and distribution of electricity. In general it refers to the application of the latest computation and communication technologies to manage the legacy power grid but it also takes into account the advances in new sustainable generation sources, storage devices, electric vehicles and other new technologies that affect the power grid. The goals are always higher reliability and efficiency. We present the research in smart grid at Washington State University (WSU). In particular, we describe the Northwest Demonstration Project in which the city of Pullman, Washington (population 27,000) will be made into a ‘smart city’ with the use of distribution automation, smart meters and real time in-the-home monitoring. In addition, the WSU campus distribution system, the largest electricity consumer in Pullman, will be turned into a smart microgrid with its ability to manage its own system as well as respond to external requests with load shedding and generation starting. 



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